A Periscope Oops!

screenfaceWe have come to expect people to do really stupid things and post it on social media.  For some reason, people enjoy being ridiculed, being the center of attention or are just too messed up to realize what they are doing.

In a lot of cases, people share posts about their illegal activity and end up being arrested.  The convicted felon posts a photo of him holding a gun.  Another subject sets up a drug deal on social media and is surprised when the police show up.  Illegal activity is posted online frequently.

We as law enforcement are not surprised by these types of incidents.  We have come to expect them.  Frankly, we have seen it all.  However, a recent video posted on Periscope surprised even the most seasoned veteran.

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Periscope as a Crime Fighting Tool

PeriscopeI ran across an interesting article about the Bengarulu Police Department in India deciding to use Periscope.  That part of the story was not noteworthy.  In fact, many departments are using Periscope to broadcast press conferences and various community events.  The Dallas Police Department recently used Periscope to broadcast their press conference about the gunman who attacked their department.  Check out this video about the Boca Raton Police Department using Periscope.  In an interesting turn of events, the Police Commissioner of Bengarulu, M.N. Reddi, would like citizens to use Periscope to live-stream crimes in progress via Periscope.  Is this practical or should it even be considered?

Commissioner Reddi is a #LESM influencer in his country and has over 290,000 followers on Twitter @CPBlr, so when he speaks, people listen.  But, does what he says have any practical value?  Law enforcement has always asked our citizens to be good witnesses without putting themselves at risk.  The question is would using Periscope to live-stream crimes in progress put citizens at risk? 

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